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Posts Tagged ‘map’

2012 Primary Schools Performance in Tableau

February 8th, 2014 Comments off

I wrote an earlier post as part of my Alteryx training using 2012 UK primary school data. As per this post on joining data in Alteryx, using the trade area tool in Alteryx and exporting the data into a TDE file, a Tablea Data Extract, I have now put the data into Tableau. In a couple of years when my son is a little older I’ll have to recreate this with up to date primary school data.

Alteryx and Tableau to display UK schools data

February 6th, 2014 Comments off

As part of my Alteryx training, following on from my starting out with Alteryx, I decided to try and use it for a real world example to test it out. I recently had a baby so have to start thinking about schools. Luckily the UK government make school performance data public and the excellent Guardian Datablog have tidied it up for me (the data is for 2012, hence now out of date, but good enough for my training in Alteryx). The data contains school address details, local authority details, school size, school religion and multiple measures of performance.

I would like to know which schools are performing well – i.e. their pupils have high attainment in their exams – and then see which streets are within X miles to help guide me which streets I would need to live to get my son into a chosen school. Alteryx has an in built function called Trade Area where it can map show you a chose radius from a point, which is ideal for the schools approximated catchment area analysis.

Radius of 0.3 miles around each school

Radius of 0.3 miles around each school

Each purple dot is a school with the cirle around the dot being the approximate catchment area, although looking at this it appears the catchment area in London will, in reality, be less than 0.3 miles. Read more…

Basic Maps in Tableau

December 23rd, 2011 2 comments

I’ve been meaning to write about the maps in Tableau for some time now as I’m really impressed with how they look, how easy they are to use and how powerful they are as a visual geographic reporting tool.

If you have geographic data, preferably with a longitude and latitude, you can display mapped data in a matter of minutes. Tableau maps allows zooming in and out – although this isn’t the most user friendly when compared to the likes of Google maps. Read more…